Beaches

Anytime is the perfect time to hit the beach and catch some rays on the Capricorn Coast. A beach for every taste, perfect kids beaches, private sands, 4WD access, or hit the waves.

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Beach Bumming

Warm year round. Yeppoon Capricorn Coast beaches are easy to enjoy.

Whether you are seeking a romantic trip for two, a family break during school holidays or a fun-filled 4WD weekend with good friends, a holiday in our many areas of sand fits all. If you need to slow down, take it easy and enjoy your surrounds, our beaches are the perfect place to do just that. Capricorn Coast beaches are a source of leisure and a place of health and wellbeing. Sit back, enjoy the sound of the waves rolling the sand, build yourself some sandcastles and gain a dose of valuable Vitamin D. Or bring the bat and ball & stay. (NOTE: This page is one big list at the moment but over time each beach will be featured.)

Beaches of Capricorn Coast

Info courtesy of Livingstone Shire Council Website, who gleaned it from Beaches Australia list.
Alligator Bay and Stanage Bay are the next two bays south of the eastern Arthur Point headland. They face north-east and are backed by mainly cleared, gently rising land, with the main Stanage Bay Road running less than 1 kilometre west, providing road access to each. Alligator Bay is a continuous sandy beach bordered by 20 metres high headlands.

Waves and Tide
The beach is moderately steep at high tide, with a 50 metres wide low tide bar, then more rock offshore.
Tide ranges regularly exceed 7 metres. Low waves break in Stanage Bay only during strong easterly winds
and waves.

Swimming
Stanage Bay is one of the safer beaches in the area, with usually low waves spilling across the shallow bar.

Fishing
For best fishing results cast off the rocky point and platforms, or the two Stanage Bay creeks. Fishing in this area (Stanage Bay and Alligator Bay) can produce a variety of reef fish such as coral trout, barramundi and red emperor. Huge mud crabs are also common. There is a number of places in the Stanage Bay area where you can hire a small boat for fishing purposes.

Other
Access to the rocks, pools and tiny caves are able to be explored when the tide is out. In season, turtles come ashore to lay their eggs and you may see a dugong in the large areas of seagrass. Sunrise and sunsets over this beach are spectacular viewings. There are also some great spots around the area for rock climbing for experienced rock climbers and avid bird-watchers will be able to view a number of species. 

At Alligator Point, you can drive or walk to the top of the point and take in the breath-taking view.
Freshwater is not readily available, so be sure to bring your own.

Barwell Creek is one of the longest beaches on the Capricorn Coast with good access points as well as many kilometres of natural beach.
This beach begins at the small Barwell Creek and continues for 2.6 kilometres to the low rock of Spring Head. It is backed by rising land toward the head and the northern suburbs of Yeppoon. The main road parallels the back of most of this beach, with a foreshore reserve and caravan-park located between the road and the beach.


Waves and Tide
The beaches are composed of fine sand and exposed to waves averaging 0.8 metres. These factors maintain
a low, narrow high tide beach fronted by a 200 metre wide, low gradient, low tide beach. Waves spill across
the low gradient bar at all stages of the tide, and rips are usually absent. There is a possibility of low spilling waves. The bigger and better waves are usually up towards the spit.

 

Swimming
Barwell is a relatively safe beach under normal low, spilling wave conditions. However, higher waves will induce rips toward low tide, and possibly longshore currents.

 

Fishing
Most fishers head along the beach to Corio Bay, while some may fish the beach at high tide.

Facilities

–  Parking –  Toilets
–  Caravans –  Drinking Water Available
Causeway Lake is located between Mulambin Beach and Kinka Beach on the Scenic Highway. Access is available from Scenic Highway on both Kinka Beach and Mulambin Beach sides of the lake. Affectionately known to locals as ‘The Causeway’.

Waves and Tide
The Causeway Lake is a man-made feature, formed by the bridge that crosses Mulambin Creek, which allows
fresh salt water in on the high tide.

Swimming
This is a safe swimming area for families on the landward side of the bridge and a steady channel on the seaward side for anglers.

Fishing
The causeway is a very shallow lake, popular for fishing.

Boat
The suburb of Mulambin Waters backs onto the waterway, with a dock for fishing and entertaining.

Other
Causeway Lake has a takeaway, caravan park, and boat hire. Boat ramps are located on both sides of the lake.

Facilities

–   Picnic Area –  Toilets 
–   Shower –  Camping
–   Caravans –  Gas BBQ
–  Swimming –  Kayaking
–  Sailing Boats –  Motorboat Access
–  Fishing –  Dogs on Leash
–  Stinger Warning –  Parking

Cocoanut Beach is a low, rocky point that runs for 1km between Zilzie and Cocoanut Point. The beach faces south-east but is protected from high waves by the sand flats. It is one of three Emu Park beaches.

Waves and Tide
This beach consists of a low gradient, high tide beach which is fronted by low sand flats up to 300m wide in the centre of the beach. A tidal channel runs along the outside of the flats, coming closer inshore off the two points. The beach is backed by beachfront houses of a relatively new housing estate, with limited access to the beach.

There is no surf at this beach.

Swimming
This is one of three low energy beaches in the area. High tide is the best time for swimming at this beach.
Be careful if out on the tidal flats at low tide, as they are bordered by the deep tidal channel.

Fishing
Fishing is best at high tide or in a boat.

Located on the southern side of Wave Point is Cooee Bay, a 500 metre long, curving beach extending from the point to the southern Wreck Point. The beach is bordered by 20 metre high headlands with rocky platforms and reefs.

Waves and Tide
Cooee Bay has a moderately steep high tide sand beach fronted by a continuous, 50 meters wide, low-tide bar. Waves average less than 0.5 metres and rips are usually absent. There is a chance of low, spilling waves at Cooee Bay.

Swimming
The most popular beaches for swimming are Cooee Bay and Lammermoor, with most rocks dominating Wave Point and Statue Bay areas, and Rosslyn Bay given over to boating activities.

Fishing
In this area, Rosslyn Bay boat harbour breakwaters are the most common spots used for fishing, but you are able to fish from several rocky points at high tide.

Other
These five beaches are a southern extension of Yeppoon and are very accessible either from the backing streets or the main road.

To get to Coorooman Creek; at the large roundabout on Emu Park Road, turn north into the Hartley Street exit. Continue to Svendsens Road (shop on the corner). Travel to the end of Svendsens Road to the boat ramp. The last 4 kilometres is good gravel, all weather.

Swimming
No swimming.

Fishing
Around the mouth of the creek, there have been some catches of some blue salmon and there have been schools of whiting in there too. Further up the creek (out of the wind), you might be able to catch some bream, flathead and barramundi.

You can fish from the shore, the mudbanks or from a boat and catch a stack of different species using bait caught at your feet. Families often drive down to the boat ramp on the Zilzie side and spend the day with the chance of nailing a top feed
.

Boat
A Boat Ramp is available for use.

Other
Remember to keep an eye out for crocodiles. Recent sightings, medium and large crocs (estimated, 5 metres) have been seen in this area.

Facilities
There are facilities located at the Boat Ramp location.

–  Toilet                  – Motorboat Access                                      
–  Picnic Table – Rock Fishing
–  Open Water Fishing – No Swimming
–  Pets Welcome
–  Trekking  
Just south of Emu Park on the northern banks of Coorooman Creek is the growing township of Zilzie.  Zilzie Beach is the longest and most accessible of the three beaches. It is 600m long and has finer sand than either Rocky Point and Arthur Point.

Waves and Tide
Zilzie Beach has a 200m wide, low gradient high and low tide beach. Better chance of low, spilling breakers at Arthurs Point and Zilzie than at Rocky Point.

Swimming
Zilzie is the most accessible and safest, despite being dominated by rocky boundaries.

Fishing
Best results are off the rocks at high tide.

Facilities
There is a small car park at the northern end, an amenities block in the centre and a picnic area toward the south, with houses backing the beachfront road.

–  Parking –  Toilets                                         
–  Drinking Water Available  
Situated on the southern bank of Corio Bay, Sandy Point is a pristine stretch of beach stretching twenty kilometres north of Yeppoon. Corio Bay is a dynamic, sand-filled tidal inlet. It has a 2-kilometre wide mouth between Water Park Point and the low Sandy Point. Sandy Point is the northern spit of the 17 kilometres long Farnborough Beach and barrier system that has built out up to 3 kilometres seaward, and accumulated over 20 kilometres of marine beach and sand dunes.

This large accumulation of sand and beach remains in a natural state for the first 10 kilometres, with the
southern 7 kilometres housing Capricorn International Resort, Farnborough Beach and Bangalee Beach.

To drive to Sandy Point along the beach, you will definitely need a 4WD. Also, research the tides so you can plan your
trip. There is a 4×4 access via Bangalee, along the firm beach at low tide
.

Waves and Tide
Chance of low, spilling waves. The bigger and usually best waves are up closer toward the spit.

Swimming
Be very careful at Corio Bay as there are strong tidal currents and deep channels off the spit.
Corio Bay is a renowned habitat for saltwater crocodiles. Swimming in the creeks at Corio Bay is definitely not
recommended. 

Bangalee and Sandy Point are relatively safe beaches under normal low, spilling wave conditions. However, higher waves will induce rips toward low tide, and possibly longshore currents. 

Fishing
Most fishers head along the beach to Corio Bay, but some fish the main beach areas at high tide.

2WD:
In dry weather, Sandy Point is accessible by gravel road through the back of Capricorn
International Resort.  

4WD: Sandy Point is accessible via beach access at Bangalee. You will also drive through the beach area
of the Resort, so please take extra care and show courtesy when passing resort guests
.

Facilities
There are no amenities, shops, or drinking water at Sandy Point or Corio Bay, so you will need to
take all supplies with you
. Bangalee Beach is close to Capricorn International Resort if you require
these facilities. 

–  Picnic Area –  Cycling
–  Lookouts  –  Swimming
–  Kayaking –  Sailing
–  Motorboat Access –  Fishing
–  Crocodile Warning  –  Stinger Alert
–  Parking –  Dogs on Leash Allowed
Rita Mada is beautiful, peaceful and private, with some of the best views on the Capricorn Coast, but it is both difficult to find and get to. This lovely, secluded beach can only be accessed by foot or by kayak.

Rita Mada Road is gravel and turns off the Scenic Highway just north of Emu Park. There are gated private properties at the end of the road which dominates much of the peninsula, however sand tracks to the beachhead off on the left just before these gates. These sand tracks lead you directly onto Rita Mada Beach.

The sand is loose and you will definitely need a 4WD to gain access to the beach. Do not attempt the track in a normal vehicle. After heavy rain or king tides, some of the tracks become a boggy swamp.

Kayaking from Mulambin Beach is a 14-kilometre return journey – starting from Kinka Creek – this a good
alternative for a shorter journey.

Fishing
Fishing off the beach can be good at times, as the channel runs around the headland from Tanby Point
before continuing on to Kinka Creek and Causeway Lake.
Bream, whiting, pike, wolf herring, fingermark and
cod are common catches from this beach.

Boat
There are a lot of rocks (submerged and visible) that come out a long way, and it’s likely that you will
wreck your propeller, therefore it is recommended you don’t attempt landing your boat there
.

Facilities
There are no facilities or fresh water at Rita Mada, so we advise taking everything you need.

–  4WD Only –  Hiking Trails
–  Swimming  –  Kayaking
–  Fishing  –  Dogs on Leash
–  Stinger Warning  

Previously known as ‘Mens Beach’, today it is known as Emu Park Main Beach. The beach is surrounded by an extensive grassy foreshore reserve and parking areas. The reserve runs the full length of the beach, with houses set well back from the shore.

Waves and Tide

Emu Park Main Beach is the surfing beach for Emu Park, usually offering a low beach break. The waves average 0.5-1 metres, which break across a wide, low gradient beach. At high tide the beach is 50 metres wide, extending to over 200 metres wide at low tide.

Swimming
Emu Park Main Beach is a quiet beach, with calm waters. The beach is patrolled by Surf Life Saving
This beach is a relatively safe beach, and at its best during mid to high tide. However, when waves
exceed 0.5 metres rips may occur at low tide and around the rocks.

Fishing
Fishing is best off the rocks at each end. The Timbers (a popular fishing spot near the mouth of
Coorooman Creek) is only accessible by Four-Wheel-Drive.

Boat
A boat ramp is available on the north side of Emu Point, and at Zilzie. The Zilzie ramp offers direct access to Coorooman Creek. By sea, Emu Park is 8 kilometres north of Keppel Sands or 35 kilometres by
road. Keppel Sands and Emu Park are separated by
 Coorooman Creek.

Other
The beach has shady picnic facilities and is close to shops.
Dogs are not allowed.
Emu Park has an airfield available for light planes.

Facilities

–  Parking –  Toilets (Including Disabled Access) 
–  Showers –  BBQ
–  Picnic Tables –  Lookout
–  Trekking –  Swimming
–  Kayaking –  Sailing
–  Motorboat Access –  Fishing
–  Crocodile Warning –  Stinger Warnings
–  No Camping –  No Vehicles on Beach
–  No Bike Roading –  No Dogs

 

Farnborough Beach is composed of fine sand and exposed to waves averaging 0.8 metres. These factors maintain a low narrow high tide beach fronted by a 200 metre-wide, low gradient low tide beach. Waves spill across the low gradient bar at all stages of the tide, and rips are usually absent.

At Bangalee, there is a 4WD beach access onto Farnborough Beach. The beach which is seventeen kilometres long offers a good beach break for surfers and hosts the annual ‘Rock Yeppoon Surf Festival’.
The northern point of Farnborough beach is Sandy Point, and the beach ends in the south at Barwell Creek.

Waves and Tide
The waves can be flat or they can be high.

Swimming
Relatively safe beach under normal low, spilling wave conditions. However, higher waves will induce rips
toward low tide and possibly longshore currents.

Fishing
Most fishers head along the beach to Corio Bay, while some fish this beach at high tide.

Boat
Bangalee, where most people access Farnborough Beach, has a boat ramp.

Other
One of the longest beaches on the coast with good access and an international standard beachfront resort, as well as many kilometres of natural beach.

Dogs are allowed off leash from Bangalee boat ramp onwards to Barwell Creek.

Five Rocks beach is a straight 5.3km long, east facing beach that lies between The Three Rivers headland and Five Rocks Point. Five Rocks is named due to the presence of five distinctive sea stacks that sit atop the narrow, 600m long point. 

The entire beach is backed by stable, vegetated parabolic dunes that extend up to 8km inland and reach heights of over 200m. A relatively accessible beach, just 10km by a sandy 4WD track from the Byfield Road.

The beach itself has a 50m wide, moderate gradient high tide beach, fronted by a 150m wide low tide bar. Average wave is 0.6m, occasionally has higher waves cutting rips every 200m. A trough and outer bar lie just seaward, with more widely spaced rips cutting the outer bar.

Waves and Tide
Five Rocks is the northernmost of the more accessible beaches (from Yeppoon) and is occasionally visited by local surfers looking for a beach break, when it gets windy or during occasional swell conditions.

Swimming
This is a moderately safe beach when waves are less than 0.5m – above that the rips are active at mid to low tide.

Fishing
The southern Five Rocks Point has extensive rock platforms and is a popular spot to fish.

Other
Five Rocks Beach is partly located in the Byfield National Park, while a sign on the beach marks the beginning of the Shoalwater Bay Military Reserve and this area is often off limits.

Dogs are not permitted on any beach adjacent to Byfield National Park.

Five Rocks Visitor Area has camping, picnic tables, toilets and cold showers.

Facilities

–  Camping –  Fires Allowed
–  4WD Only –  Toilets
–  Showers –  Picnic Area
–  Fishing –  No Dogs Allowed
Fishermans Beach runs due south of Tanby Point for 2km, curving around Emu Point almost facing north. Twenty metre high vegetated dunes back the northern half, with access to the north also from Tanby Point.

Swimming
Fishermans Beach is by far the more accessible, popular and safer beach in the area, servicing Emu Park
locals and visitors.

Waves and Tide
Fishermans Beach offers generally low, spilling waves that are usually higher on Tanby Beach.
Fishermans Beach is somewhat protected by the point and receives low waves in the south, rising to less than 0.5m to the north. The waves break across a wide, low gradient low tide beach, with a moderately steep high tide beach.

Fishing
Fishermans Beach is the focus of boat fishing, however, there are plenty of rocks and rock platforms to fish
at high tide.

Boat
The protection afforded by Emu Point has long been used to launch fishing boats, thereby giving the beach its name.Today the southern end is backed by a large, grassy foreshore reserve and caravan park, with a long boat ramp protected by a groyne in the southern corner.

Kemp Beach is located just south of Rosslyn Bay Marina, on the Scenic Highway that links Yeppoon and Emu Park. The Beach is nestled between two large post-volcanic trachyte headlands; Double Head to the north, and Bluff Point to the south, both of which are part of the Capricorn Coast National Park.

Waves and Tide
Only low spilling waves at Kemp Beach, averaging less than 0.5 m that break across a 200 m wide, low gradient low tide bar and up a moderate gradient high tide beach. A 10 m high, grass and casuarina-covered foredune backs the beach, with the road running along the back of the foredune to provide good access for the length of the beach.

Swimming
Kemp is a popular spot for swimming, especially for people seeking deeper water and larger waves than the neighbouring flat beaches at Lammermoor and Mulambin. Kemp is quite popular and very accessible, with the usually low waves and very low gradients it makes swimming relatively safe.

Fishing
Fishing is favourable on the northern end of the beach.

Other
Kemp Beach has five walking access points, plenty of parking in either the car parking bays that line the highway or at the picnic area at the base of Bluff Point. Vehicles are not allowed on the beach.

Kemp Beach has no camping facilities. The car parks are routinely policed in the evenings and illegal campers moved on. Kemp Beach’s distance from the nearest town lights also makes it a great place for stargazing with friends at night.

Dogs are permitted at designated times. Note that while dogs are allowed on leash at the beach, they are not allowed in the picnic areas or walking trails of the National Park.

The south end of Kemp Beach has a picnic area and a good walking trail over the top of Bluff Point. From the lookout, green turtles and dolphins are a common sight, and if you’re lucky, the occasional dugong in the waters at the base of the cliff. The view of the surrounding coastline is well worth the climb.

The bushwalk takes about thirty minutes.

Just offshore is Bluff Rock which is a 10-minute paddle by kayak or canoe. 

Keppel Sands located 15 km off the Emu Park Road and 40 km from Rockhampton. The road ends at the Sands and, apart from the locals, not many tourists make it out here. 

The southern point is a 200m long, low sandy beach (Keppel Sands Point) which is wedged between two rocky points. Backed by 40m high grassy bluffs, Keppel Sands Point has an Air-Sea Rescue station located on the crest, offering a commanding view of Keppel Bay. There is a road to the station, but no formal access to the beach.

Waves and Tide
No waves.

Swimming
Keppel Sands Point can be used at the high and low tide.

Fishing
Keppel Sands is a fishing community, with most fishing taking place in the creeks and the bay. The best boat access is via Pumpkin Creek, where there are a boat ramp and a few jetties. You can only fish from the shore at high tide.

Other
Keppel Sands Point is an out of the way, older style settlement with a caravan park for visitors.

It is situated on the banks of Kinka Creek, about 6kms north of Emu Park and seventeen kilometres south of Yeppoon. Kinka beach is 3km long, faces east-north-east and consists of a narrow and, in places, eroding high tide beach fronted by several hundred metres of variable low tide sand flats and ridges. 

The creek that used to drain across the northern end of the beach has been dammed by The Causeway and the tidal flats are still readjusting to the absence of the tidal currents that flowed in and out of the creek. To combat the resulting shoreline dynamics, a seawall and more recently an artificial sand barrier have been built along the northern end of the beach.

The protected southern end of Kinka Beach ends at a mangrove-fringed tidal creek, on the other side of which is the very low energy beach 1372, a 1.2 km long, crenulate, curving, north facing, narrow high tide beach fronted by several hundred metres of tidal flats and numerous mangroves. There is a vehicle track off the main road to the rear of the beach. The beach ends at a low, rocky, mangrove-fringed point, beyond which is a 500m long, west facing high tide beach fronted by extensive sand and rock flats.

Swimming
The usually low waves and low gradients provide relatively safe swimming at Kemp and Mulambin.

The beach is backed by the main road, with parking areas and access provided at each end, and a caravan park, motel and houses along the western side of the road.

Lammermoor Beach is a 2.5km long beach backed by a casuarina-covered foredune, with houses in the north and the main road running right behind the southern half of the beach. The best access is at a small bluff-top car park in the centre of the beach, below which are a few rocks across the beach.

Waves and Tide
Lammermoor Beach has a relatively steep high tide beach, with a lower gradient, 100m wide, continuous low tide bar that widens at the southern end where a small creek drains across the beach. The beach ends in low energy at Statue Rocks.

Swimming
The most popular beaches are Cooee Bay and Lammermoor, with rocks dominating Wave Point and Statue Bay, while Rosslyn Bay is given over to boating activities.

Surfing
There is a chance of low spilling waves at Cooee Bay and Lammermoor beaches.

Fishing
Most shore fishers use the Rosslyn Bay boat harbour breakwaters, while you can also fish from the several rocky points at high tide.

Boat
At the southern end of Lammermoor, Statue Bay provides easy access for launching kayaks and canoes. Just beyond Statue Bay is Rosslyn Bay, which is a 400+ berth marina, and has boat ramps for launching vessels of any size, in the shadow of the towering trachyte hill, Double Head.

Other
Vehicles are not allowed to be driven on Lammermoor Beach.

In the north, Wreck Point towers above the beach and provides the perfect vantage point to admire the view.

Facilities
A popular park with ample car parking is located midway along the beach plus several smaller access points along the beach.

Nine Mile Beach is 13 km long, facing east and runs essentially due south from the southern flanks of Stockyard Point to Water Park Point.

Beach

The beach and massive backing dune fields lie within Byfield National Park and are accessible by 4WD along a 7km sandy track off the Byfield Road. The track reaches the beach 2km south of Stockyard Point.

There is no development on the beach, however, fresh water can be obtained from the many soaks that drain across the beach, including a small waterfall toward the northern end. A track also leads up to the Stockyard shack settlement and the entire beach can be driven at low tide when firm sand is exposed.

Waves and Tide

The beach receives waves averaging 0.6 m and consists of a 50 m wide high tide beach, fronted by a 150 m wide low tide bar which, during high waves, is usually cut by rips every 200 m, resulting in up to 50 rips along the beach. Ashore parallel trough and outer bar, cut by more widely spaced rips, lie just offshore.

Swimming

The best swimming is at mid to high tide, as rips are often present at low tide. Nine Mile Beach is the closest big wave beach outside of Yeppoon and is often visited by locals. The breaks are better at mid to low tide.

Fishing

This beach is popular with the locals and visitors who usually fish the rips or drive down the beach to fish and catch crabs in Corio Bay.

Other

A long and relatively energetic beach with freshwater soaks and massive dunes.

The two main surfing beaches immediately south of Emu Point were called Ladies and Mens Beaches. The small Ladies Beach still goes by that name, while Mens is now known as Emu Park Main Beach and is the site of the Surf Lifesaving Club.

Swimming
A relatively safe beach, and is at its best at mid to high tide. Be careful when waves exceed 0.5m as rips may occur, at low tide and around the rocks.

Waves and Tide
The beach receives waves averaging 0.5m that break across a 50m wide low tide bar; the high tide beach is usually absent, owing to the rocks. Ladies Beach is the surfing beach for Emu Park, offering a usually low beach break. Ladies Beach is one of the more hazardous beaches in the area, particularly when waves are breaking over the rocks.

Fishing
For best results, fish off the rocks at each end.

Swimming
There is a boat ramp on the north side of Emu Point.

Other
Ladies Beach is a patrolled beach, has a large car park and the Singing Ship Memorial on the bluffs.

Facilities
Drinking Water, Parking, Showers/Toilet

 

Water Park Point is an irregular, 80m high headland that forms the southern boundary of Nine Mile Beach and the northern head of Corio Bay. There is no formal vehicle access to the point or the beach and no development. 

The Water Park Point faces north-east and is wedged into two small adjoining valleys. The beach has an irregular, rocky backshore, then 100m-wide intertidal to low tide sandy beach. Further on, the beach is backed by a 50m boulder beach, flanked by wide rock platforms and fronted by a similar sandy beach.

Waves and Tide
Waves average about 0.4 m and spill across the low gradient bar. Little Corio Bay usually has a beach break and picks up most swell.

Swimming
Little Corio Bay is the more attractive beach as it has less rock. 

Fishing
There are excellent rocks to fish from at Water Park Point

Other
It is well worth a slow walk around Water Park Point to see the views of the headlands. It’s nice to also stop for a swim, surf or some fishing at one of the beaches.

Yeppoon Main Beach has traditionally been the main beach and is patrolled by Surf Lifesaving Club.

The beach is 1.4 km long, extending from the low intertidal rocks at Spring Head almost due south to the mouth of Ross Creek, where there is a small breakwater. The surf club is located in the reserve toward the northern end of the beach and the Keppel Bay Sailing Club toward the southern end, where sailing boats are often launched.
Waves and Tide
The seawall is reached by the waves at high tide, resulting in little to no high tide beach and a low, flat 200m to 300m wide low tide beach composed of fine sand. The beach is partially protected from waves by the Keppel Island group, and waves average only 0.5m.

 Swimming

A relatively safe beach; just be careful at low tide when you have to walk a long way to reach the water, and near the southern end which has both deeper water and strong tidal currents.

 Fishing
Ross Creek is generally a better option for successful fishing.

Boat

Sailing boats are launched near the Keppel Bay Sailing Club.

Other

A major tourist destination and a popular and very accessible beach, backed by all tourist facilities.

Please note that dogs are not allowed.

Yeppoon’s foreshore is a popular destination for tourists and locals and is the location for the new zero-depth water play facility known as the Keppel Kraken. This zero-depth water play feature is new to Yeppoon and is a hub for social and active play. 

Facilities
The beach has excellent access ramps, toilets, electric BBQs and picnic facilities. It is also the focal point for many coastal community events, such as Pinefest and annual Australia Day celebrations.

On the south side of Water Park Point is a 750m long, east facing beach, Little Corio Bay. It is a relatively straight sand beach, backed by a vegetated dune field (that at one time spilled into backing Corio Bay) and a stable foredune.

Usually, three to four rips cut across the base of the bar, including a permanent rip against the southern headland. Some rocks also lie off the southern end of the beach, with rock platforms bordering the headlands at each end.

Waves and Tide
Usually a 50m wide high tide beach and a 150m wide low tide beach and bar.

Swimming
Little Corio Bay has fewer rocks than Water Park Point, however, it gets higher waves and is prone to rips at mid to low tide, so use caution.

Surfing
Little Corio Bay usually has a beach break and picks up most swell.

Fishing
There are excellent rocks to fish from, and Little Corio Bay also has rip holes.

Other
It is well worth a wander around the massive tidal flats of Corio Bay, as well as stopping for a swim, surf or some fishing at one of the beaches.

Corio Bay is a renowned habitat for saltwater crocodiles. Swimming in the creeks at Corio Bay is not recommended.

Facilities
There are no amenities, shops, or drinking water at Corio Bay, so you will need to take all supplies with you.

The remote township of Stanage is actually three separate mini-suburbs. Alligator Bay is the first turn-off, Happy Valley the next and the road then continues into Stanage Bay. This could be referred to as the CBD as it is the location of the area’s two main businesses, the Endeavour Park campsite, boat ramp, Coast Guard and the Sea Rescue facilities.

Alligator Bay and Stanage Bays are two bays south of the eastern Arthur Point. The two bays face north-east and are backed by mainly cleared, gently rising land, with the main Stanage Bay Road running less than 1km west, providing road access to each. Stanage Bay is the second main bay on the northern peninsula and contains one of the nicer beaches.

It is a 1.7km long, curving, low gradient beach, broken in the centre by a 20m high islet connected to the low tide bar. Stanage Point, capped by 70m high Bald Hill, forms the southern boundary, with a 20m high cleared headland separating it from Alligator Bay.

Waves and Tide
Low, rideable waves break in Stanage Bay only during strong easterly winds and waves. The beach receives waves averaging less than 0.5m that come right up the beach at high tide, while low tide reveals a 200m wide bar. Two creeks drain across the beach, one north of the islet and a second in the southern corner.

Swimming
Stanage Bay is one of the safer beaches in the area, with usually low waves spilling across the shallow bar. All three headland-bound beaches (Arthur Point, Alligator and Stanage Bays) offer the best swimming and recreation.

Fishing
Best fishing is off the rocky point and platforms, and in the two Stanage Bay creeks.

Boat
There is a very good two-lane concrete boat ramp for boat owners. This is quite steep and restricts the larger boats to about a three to four-hour window either side of the tide. It is wise to practise your reversing skills and make sure your boat is ready to launch as soon as it hits the water.

The two lane concrete boat ramp is tidal and most of the estuary is not surveyed so please speak to a local or at least view the waterways at low tide from the boat ramp to give you some idea of the tide height difference and calculate when you will be able to launch and retrieve your boat.

Coast Guard Thirsty Sound Channel 81 gives local weather forecasts at 6.33am.

Other

Stanage Bay beach is backed by cleared land of the Stanage Bay homestead, located 400m in from the beach.

The roads around Stanage Bay get flooded with heavy rains, so be sure to factor this into your plans.

Make sure you have spare fuel in your car. Stanage Bay is also sparse with drinking water, so it would be wise to make sure you have plenty on you before you get to town.

Beach Car Access

The only beaches vehicles are allowed to drive on legally in the Capricorn Coast region are Farnborough Beach – north of the Bangalee beach access, and beaches in Byfield National Park – Nine Mile Beach and limited access to Five Rocks Beach, (also known as Three Rivers). No driving is permitted on the beaches on North or Great Keppel Islands. 

Boat Ramps

Information on the location and access points of Boat Ramps.

Jelly Fish Warnings

While Jellyfish ‘season’ is commonly between October and May, a lot of our beaches get non-stinging jellyfish year-round. We also on occasion have stingers that will make you profane loudly. Best to familiarise yourself with how to treat a jellyfish sting. For Sea Creature Bites and Stings, try Health Direct Australia.

Fishing 

Before fishing on the Capricorn Coast, please familiarise Queensland fishing regulations. Minimum size and maximum bag limits apply to popular reef fish species. Queensland fisheries legislation applies in zones where fishing is permitted. Spearfishing is restricted to North and Great Keppel islands. Visit Department of Agriculture and Fisheries for more information.

Horse Riding

Farnborough beach is the best beach for a canter down the shoreline. Our horse riding page has all the information.

Ouchie Beach Jelly!

Don’t touch!

Fun Beach Jelly!

I’m cool 🙂

What are you waiting for?